Hyper-V did not find virtual machines to import from the location . The operation failed with error code ‘32784’.


I got contacted by some people how ran into some issues importing VMs from W2K12R2 Hyper-V into W2K12 Hyper-V. They got bitten by this “little” issue: Importing a VM that is exported from Windows Server 2012 R2 into Windows Server 2012 is not supported

This means you get greeted by

Hyper-V did not find virtual machines to import from the location <folder location>.
The operation failed with error code ‘32784’.

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No the trick of not exporting the VM but doing an “in place” registration doesn’t cut it. That’s great for W2K8R2 to W2K12 or W2K12 to W2K12R2 but not from W2K12R2 to a lower version. In that way the title of the KB article could be seen as a bit misleading or incomplete, but the contents is pretty clear.

And that’s it. Woeps! What you have 200 VMs on the LUNs form the old cluster you already blew away to build the new one? You do have a tested exit plan for this right? Uh no?

Facepalm Combo

Oh MAN, NOOOOO!

Now if it’s only one or two VMs you can always work around this by creating new VMs using the old VHDXs. This will leave you to deal with networking cleanup inside of the VMs and configuring TCP/IP. PowerShell can help here but in large volumes this remains as serious effort. This is also the time that documentation pays!

Now what if this happens to you when you’re trying to roll back a migration of a hyper-V cluster (revert W2K12R2 to W2K12 for example). Well for one you should have know as you did test all this right? Right?!

What are your other options to roll back other than  the above? From the top of my head and without details?

  • Move back to your old cluster Smile You didn’t already nuke it, I hope.
  • If you have a SAN take a snapshot of the LUNs before you move them to Windows Server 2012 R2 for faster fall back. But beware, if you’re running applications that require some tender loving care in relation to snapshots like Exchange  or Active Directory in those VMs … shutting all VMs down before you create the can help snapshot mitigates issues but is not a full proof approach! “Know thy apps”!
  • A great backup & RESTORE solution to get you back up and running also comes in handy but don’t forget that it requires you to know your apps as well here. Yes, it’s not always just “CLICKEDYCLICKCLICKDONE”
  • Perhaps it’s now time to activate your paused replicas on the DRC cluster or hosts?  You did test this didn’t you?

Now for anyone involved in a migration to Windows Server 2012 R2 there is no excuse not to know this in advance and to test out the new cluster hardware as much as you can. This minimizes the chance you’ll need to fall back. And please test your exit scenarios, really, I mean it.  Also please, you can migrate one LUN/CSV at the time. Try to run the VMs on the first migrated LUN/CSV before you do all the others. That way you can do some damage control.

Now, this is not great but it is what it is and at least now you know before your migrate Winking smile. We’ve also asked MSFT to make falling back a bit less “"involved” in future versions. Perhaps they’ll do that, I’m pretty sure they’ll consider it. And by what we’ve seen in the recently available Technical Preview they did!

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Copy Cluster Roles Hyper-V Cluster Migration Fails at Final Step with error Virtual Machine Configuration ‘VM01’ failed to register the virtual machine with the virtual machine service


I was working on a migration of a nice two node Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V cluster to Windows Server 2012 R2. The cluster consist out of 2 DELL R610 servers and a DELL  MD3200 shared SAS disk array for the shared storage. It runs all the virtual machines with infrastructure roles etc. It’s a Cluster In A Box like set up. This has been doing just fine for 18 months but the need for features in Windows Server 2012 R2 became too much to resists. As the hardware needs to be recuperated and we have a maintenance windows we use the copy cluster roles scenario that we have used so many times before with great success. It’s the Perform an in-place migration involving only two servers scenario documented on TechNet and as described in one of my previous blogs Migrating a Hyper-V Cluster to Windows 2012 R2 for your convenience.

Virtual Machine Configuration ‘VM01’ failed to register the virtual machine with the virtual machine service

As the source host was running on Windows Server 2012 we could have done the live migration scenario but the down time would be minimal and there is a maintenance window. So we chose this path.

So we performed a good health check. of the source cluster and made sure we had no snapshots left hanging around. Yes it’s supported now for this migration scenario but I like to have as few moving parts as possible during a migration.

It all went smooth like silk. After shutting down the VMs on the source cluster node, bringing the CSV off line (and un-presenting the LUN from the source node for good measure), we present that LUN to the target host. We brought the CSV on line and when that was completed successfully we were ready to bring the virtual machines on line and that failed …

Log Name:      Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-High-Availability-Admin
Source:        Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-High-Availability
Date:          4/02/2014 19:26:41
Event ID:      21102
Task Category: None
Level:         Error
Keywords:     
User:          SYSTEM
Computer:      VM01.domain.be
Description:
‘Virtual Machine Configuration VM01’ failed to register the virtual machine with the virtual machine management service.

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Let’s dive into the other event logs. On the host the application security and system event log are squeaky clean. The Hyper-V event logs are pretty empty or clean to except for these events in the Hyper-V-VMMS Admin log.

Log Name:      Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-VMMS-Admin
Source:        Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-VMMS
Date:          4/02/2014 19:26:40
Event ID:      13000
Task Category: None
Level:         Error
Keywords:     
User:          SYSTEM
Computer:      VM01.domain.be
Description:
User ‘NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM’ failed to create external configuration store at ‘C:\ClusterStorage\HyperVStorage\VM01’: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed.. (0x800706FD)

 

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Bingo. It must be the fact that no domain controller is available. It’s completely self contained cluster and both domain controller virtual machines are highly available and reside on the CSV. Now the CSV does come on line without a DC since Windows Server 2012 so that’s not the issue. it’s the process of registering the VMs that fails without a DC in an Active Directory environment.

Getting passed this issue

There are multiple ways to resolve this and move ahead with our cluster migration. As the environment is still fully functional on the source cluster I just removed a DC virtual machine from high availability on the cluster. I shut it down and exported it. I than copied it over to the node of the new cluster  (we’re going to nuke the source host afterwards and install W2K12R2, so we moved it to the new host where it could stay) where I put it on local storage and imported it. For this is used the “Register the virtual machine in-place option”. I did not make it high available.

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After verifying that we could ping the DC and it was up and running well we tried the final phase of the migration again. It went as smooth as we have come to expect!

Other options would have been to host the DC virtual machine on a laptop or other server. If you could no longer get to the the DC for export & import or heck even a shared nothing migration depending on your environment can help you out of this pickle. A restore from backup would also work. But here in that 2 node all in one cluster our approach was fast and efficient.

So there you go. Tip to remember. Virtualizing domain controllers is fully supported, no worries there but you need to make sure that if you have a dependency on a DC you don’t have the DC depending on that dependency. It’s chicken an egg thing.

Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2


Introduction

In this blog series we’ll walk you through the process of migrating a Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster in another Active Directory domain. You are now reading part 2.

  1. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 1
  2. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2

The source W2K8R2 Hyper-V cluster is a production environment. To test the procedure for the migration we created a new CSV on the source cluster with some highly available test virtual machines with production like network configurations (multi homed virtual machined). This allows us to demonstrate the soundness of the process on one CSV before we tackle the 4 production CSVs.

We left off in part 1 with the virtual machines on the CSV LUN we are going to migrate shutdown. We’ll now continue the process of moving the CSV LUN from the old Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 cluster to the new Windows Server 2012 R2 cluster. After that we can import them and, start them up, test that all is well and finally make them highly available in the cluster. Don’t forget the upgrade the integration components when all is done.

Removing the CSV LUN from the the source W2K8R2 Hyper-V Cluster

Just leave the VMs where they are on the LUN, un-present that LUN from the old source W2K8R2 Hyper-V cluster and present it to the new W2K12R2 Hyper-V Cluster. In our case, with a dealing with a cluster so we use a CSV. So when the LUN is presented and added to the cluster don’t forget to add it to the CSVs. Well

In Failover Cluster Manager bring the CSV that you are migrating off line. Make sure you have the correct one (green circles/arrow) to avoid down time in production.

imageWhen asked if you’re sure, confirm this

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The CSV will be brought of line, which you can verify in Disk Management

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We’re going to do our clean up already. You could wait until after the migration but we want the old cluster to look as clean and healthy for the operations people as possible so they don’t worry. So we go and remove this LUN from Cluster Shared Volumes.

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Which you’ll need to confirm

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after which your disk will be move to available storage

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Do note that if you do this it brings the LUN back on line. As it’s still a clustered diskand  there is no IO (all VMS are shut down) that’s OK. We’ll remove it form available cluster storage (“Delete” isn’t a bad as it sounds in this context)

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The storage will be gone form the cluster and off line in disk manager.

On the SAN / Shared Storage

We create a SAN snapshot for fall back purposes (we throw it away after all has gone well). If you have this option I highly advise you to do so. It’s not easy to move back form Windows Server 2012 R2 to W2K8R2 in the unlikely event you would need to do so. It also protects the VM against any errors & mishaps that might occur, if you understand how to use the snapshot to recover.

On the SAN we un map the CSV LUN from the old cluster. We could wait but this is an extra protection against two clusters seeing the same storage.

On the SAN we map that CSV LUN to the new cluster. It will appear in disk manager.

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We add this disk to the new cluster

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We add it to the CSV on the new cluster, which brings it on line.

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It uses the default naming convention of clustered disks. So this is the moment to change the name if you need or want to do so.

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So now it’s time to go Hyper-V Manager and do the actual import.

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Navigate to the folder where you Hyper-V Virtual Machine Configuration lives. This location can be central for all VM or individual per VM, depending on how the virtual machines were organized on the old source cluster. In our example it is the latter. Also note that we only have one CSV involved per VM here, so it easy. Otherwise you will need to move multiple CSVs across together, all the ones the VM or VMs depend on.

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It has found a virtual machine to import.

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This is important, select “Register the virtual machine in-place (use the existing unique ID)”

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Click “Next” to confirm the your actions

If anything about your virtual machine is not compatible with your host, the GUI allows you to make fix this. Here we have to change the correct virtual switch as they are different from the source host.

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When done, just click next and in a blink of the eye your machine will be imported. You can start it up right now to see if all went well.

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As in Windows Server 2012 (R2) we can add running virtual machines to the cluster for high availability that’s the final step.

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We can import all virtual machines on the demo CSV in the same manner. Congrats, if you set up network connectivity right and done this manual migration procedure correctly you have now migrated a first CSV with VMs to the new cluster in another AD domain that can talk to to VMs that are still on the old cluster.  Cool huh! What scenarios? Well, a hoster that has clusters in a management domain that runs different workloads for different customers (multiple ADs) or a company consolidating multiple environments on a common Hyper-V Cluster or clusters in a management domain, etc.

You need to update the integration components of the virtual machines now running but other than that, you’re all set. Just move along with the next CSVs / Virtual machines until you’re done.

Closing comments

Note, what to do if you don’t have shared storage. Move the disks to the new host/cluster, copy the data over (do NOT export the VMs, as that will not work in this scenario, see part 1) or … use VEEAM Replica. It will do the heavy lifting for you and help minimize down time.. Read this blog post by our fellow MVP Silvio Di Benedetto  and for more information Veeam Backup & Replication: Migrate VM from Hyper-V 2008 R2 to 2012 R2.

Good luck. And remember if you need any assistance, there are many highly experienced Hyper-V MVPs /consultants out there. They can always help you with your migration plans if you need it.

Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 1


Introduction

In this blog we’ll walk you through the process of migrating a Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster in another Active Directory domain. You are reading part 1.

  1. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 1
  2. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2

The source W2K8R2 Hyper-V cluster is a production environment. To test the procedure for the migration we created a new CSV on the source cluster with some highly available test virtual machines with production like network configurations (multi homed virtual machined). This allows us to demonstrate the soundness of the process on one CSV before we tackle the 4 production CSVs. Do note that in this case the two clusters do share the same SAN. If not we can move the storage, copy the data, replicate between SANs or use VEEAM Replica (see part 2 for more info).

Preparing the source W2K8R2 Hyper-V Cluster virtual machines & Cluster

Before we begin, I always make sure I have no Hyper-V snapshots  anymore on virtual machines I migrate. It prevents any issues on that front an while Windows Server 2012 R2 is better than before dealing with snapshots I prefer to have a little possible points of concern before I start such an operation.

Go to Failover Cluster Manager

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and shut down the virtual machines on the CSV you want to migrate.

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You’ll see them pending whilst they are shutting down …

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And when they are fully stopped we’ll removed the form the cluster.

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To do so, delete (scary word) the virtual machines on our CSV that’s going to be migrated from the cluster, which makes them no longer high available

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To do so you’ll need to confirm that this is what you want to do.

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In Hyper-V Manager we see that the virtual machines are indeed of line. As the virtual machines reside on cluster / CSV the path to the hard disk, config files etc is indeed under C:\ClusterStorage.

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We just close the Hyper-V Manager GUI. We will NOT export the VMs to import them on the new cluster. Why?

  1. This is not necessary as since Windows Server 2012 and as such also in R2 we can import them with the option to register them in place. No export is needed for this.
  2. Due to the fact the the is no longer there you cannot import virtual machines that have been exported from Windows 2008 R2 directly into Windows Server 2012 R2. This is due to the fact that the WMI v1 namespace was deprecated in Windows Server 2012, and then removed in Windows Server 2012 R2.  When exporting a VM from Windows 2008 R2, the WMI v1 namespace was used that resulted in an .exp file to represent the exported virtual machine. In Windows Server 2012 (R2) a new WMI namespace (version 2 or root\virtualization\v2) leverages an improved import/export model. This allows for registering the VMs in place as said in point 1. In Windows Server 2012 the version 1 WMI namespace was still there which allowed for importing of Windows Server 2008/R2 VM’s. In Windows Server 2012 R2 the version 1 namespace has been removed. So YOU CANNOT import virtual machines that where exported from Windows Server 2008/R2 into Windows Server 2012 R2. The workarounds are described here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/rmilne/archive/2013/10/22/windows-hyper-v-2012-amp-8-1-hyper-v-did-not-find-virtual-machine-to-import.aspx.

Now the combination of point 1 and 2 is what is used by the Copy cluster roles wizard in Windows Server 2012 R2. That works within a domain but not across separate AD Domains as in our case. But don’t worry. All this means is that we need to do some work manually and that’s it. That’s what we’ll describe in part 2 of this blog. Do realize you want to do this in one go as that ensures you have the least possible down time. In production don’t do part 1 of the blog on Monday and part 2 on Thursday or so Winking smile.

Read on here Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2

Migrating a Hyper-V Cluster to Windows 2012 R2


Introduction

We’ll walk through a transition of a Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V Cluster to R2. For this we’ll use the Copy Cluster Roles Wizard (that’s how the Migration Wizard is now called). You have to approaches. You can start with a R2 cluster new hardware and you might even use new storage. For the process in my lab I evicted the nodes one by one and did a node by node migration to the new cluster. How you’ll do this in your environments depends on how many nodes you have, the number of CSVs and what workload they run. This blog post is an illustration of the process. Not a detailed migration plan customized for you environment.

Step by Step

1. Preparing the Target node(s)/cluster

Install the OS, add the Hyper-V role & the Failover cluster feature on the new or the evicted node.You’ll already have some updates to install only a week after the preview bits came available. Microsoft is on top of things, that’s for sure.

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Configure the networking for the virtual switch, CSV, LM, management and iSCSI (that’s what I use in the lab) on the OS. Nothing you don’t know yet for this part.

Create a Virtual switch in Hyper-V manager. This is important. If you can you should give it the same name as the ones on the old cluster. Also note that the virtual switch name is case sensitive. If you forget to create one you will not be able to copy the hyper-v virtual machine roles.

Create a new Cluster & configure networking. One of the nice things of R2 is that is intelligent enough to see what type of connectivity suits the networks best and it defaults to that. It sees that the ISCSI network should be excluded for cluster use and that the CSV/LM network doesn’t need to allow client access.clip_image004

On the ISCSI Target (a W2K12RTM box) I remove the evicted node from the ISCSI initiators and I add the newly installed new cluster node. You can wait to do this out of precaution but the cluster itself does leave the newly detected LUNS off line by default. On top of that it detects the LUNs are in use (reservations) and you can’t even bring them on line.clip_image006

Right click the cluster and select “Copy Cluster Roles”clip_image008

Follow the wizard instructionsclip_image010

Click Next and then click Browse to select the source cluster (W2K12)clip_image012

Select “Warrior” and click OK.clip_image014

Click Next and see how the connection to the old cluster is being established.clip_image016

The wizard scans for roles on the old cluster that can be migrated.clip_image018

In this example the results are the Roles per CSV and the Replication Broker. For migration you can select one of the CSV’s and work LUN per LUN, select multiple of them or even all. It all depends on your needs and environment. I migrated them all over at once in the lab. In real live I usually do only 1 or a couple of interdependent LUNS (for example OS, DATA, LOGS, TempDB on separate CSVs of virtualized SQL Servers).clip_image020

Note that if you did not specify a virtual switch you will not see any Roles on the CSV listed. So that’s why it’s important defining a virtual switch.clip_image022

As we did it right we do see all the virtual machines. As we are not migrating to new storage we have to move all VMs on a LUN in one go. That’s because you cannot expose a LUN to multiple clusters.clip_image024

So we select all the clustered roles and click Next. As we use all capitals in the new virtual switch for the guests we are asked to map it manually. When the names are one on one identical AND in the same case, the mapping happens automatically. You can see this for the virtual switches for guest clustering CSV & ISCSI network connectivity.clip_image026

We view the report before we click next and see exactly what will be copied.clip_image028

Close the report and click Next.clip_image030

Click Next again to kick of the migration.clip_image032

When don you can view a report of the results. Click finish to close the wizard.clip_image034

You now have copied your virtual machine cluster roles and the Replication Broker role.clip_image036

Even the storage is already there in the cluster but off line as it’s not yet available to the new cluster. Remember that your workload is still running on the old cluster so all what you have do until now is a zero down time exercise. clip_image038

2. Preparing to make the switch on the source cluster node(s)

On the source cluster we shut down all the virtual machines and the Replication Broker role.clip_image040

We then take the CSVs off line.clip_image042

If you did not (or could not due to lack of disk space) create a new witness disk you can recuperate this LUN as well. Not ideal I a production migration but dynamic quorum will help you staying protected. Not so with Windows 2008 R2. But you’ll fight as you are. Things are not always perfect.clip_image044

3. Swapping The Storage From the Source To The Target

We’ll now disconnect the ISCSI initiator from the target on the old cluster node and remove the target.clip_image045

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On the ISCSI target we’ll also remove the old nodes from the list of ISCSI initiators to keep the environment clean. You could wait until you see the VMs up and running on the new environment to facilitate putting the old environment back up if the migration should fail.

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Wait until the process has completed and click applyclip_image050

4. Bringing the new cluster into production

Bring the CSV LUNs on line on the new cluster.clip_image052

You’ll see then become available / on line in the cluster storage.clip_image054

You are now ready to start up your virtual machines on the new cluster. With careful planning the down time for the services running in the virtual machines can be kept as low as 10 to 15 minutes depending on how fast you can deal with the storage switch over. Pretty neat.clip_image056

Conclusion

You can now keep adding new nodes as you evict them from the old cluster. As said the exact scenario will vary based on the workload, number of nodes and CSV in your environment. But this should give you a good head start to work out your migration part. Keep in mind this is all done using the R2 Preview bits. Things are looking pretty good.

In a future blog I’ll discuss some best practices like making sure you have no snapshots on the machines you migrate as this still causes issues like before. At least in this R2 preview.

Installing & using the Windows Server Migration Tools To Migrate Local Users & Groups


Introduction

I was working on a little project for a company that was running TS Gateway on 32bit Windows 2008. The reason they did not go for x64 at the time was that they used Virtual Server as their virtualization platform for some years and not Hyper-V. One of the drawbacks was that they could not use x64 guest VMs. Since then they have move to Hyper-V and now also run Window Server 2012. So after more than 5 years of service and to make sure they did not keep relying on aging technology it is time to move to Windows Server 2012 RD Gateway and reap the benefits of the latest OS.

All in all the Microsoft documentation is not too bad, all be it that the information is a bit distributed as you need to use various tools to complete the process. Basically, depending on the original setup of the source server you’ll need to use the TS/RD Gateway Export & Import functionality, Web Deploy (we’re at version 3.0 at the time of writing) and the Windows Server Migration Tools that were introduced with Windows 2008 R2 and are also available in Windows Server 2012.

In a number of posts I’ll be discussing some of the steps we took. You are reading the second post.

  1. x86 Windows Server 2008 TS Gateway Migration To x64 Windows Server 2012 RD Gateway
  2. Installing & using the Windows Server Migration Tools To Migrate Local Users & Groups
  3. TS/RD Gateway Export & Import (Fixing Event ID 2002 “The policy and configuration settings could not be imported to the RD Gateway server "%1"" because they are associated with local computer groups on another RD Gateway server”)

As discussed in the first part we need to migrate some local users & groups on the TS Gateway (source) server as they are also being used for some special cases of remote access, next to Active Directory users & groups for the Remote Access Policies (RAPs) & Connection Authorization Policies (CAPs). The tool the use is the Windows Server Migration Tools. These were introduced with Windows 2008 R2 and are also available in Windows Server 2012.

Some people seem to get confused a bit about the installation of the Server Migration Tools but it’s not that hard. I have used these tools several times before in the past and they work very well. You just need to read up a bit on the the deployment part and once you have it figured out they work very well.

Installing the Windows Server Migration Tools on the DESTINATION Server

First we have to install the on the DESTINATION host (W2K12 in our case, the server to which you are migrating)). For this we launch Server Manager and on the dashboard select Manage and choose Add Roles & Feature.clip_image001

Navigate through the wizard until you get to Features. Find and select Windows Server Migration Tools. Click Next.clip_image001[4]

Click Install to kick of the installation.clip_image001[9]

After a while your patience will be rewarded.clip_image001[11]

Installing the Windows Server Migration Tools on the SOURCE Server

To install the Windows Server Migration Tools on the SOURCE server, you need to run the appropriate PowerShell command on the DESTINATION server. This is what trips people up a lot of the time. You deploy the correct version of the tools from the destination server to the source server, where you will than register them for use. Do this with an admin account that has admin privileges on both the DESTINATION & SOURCE Computer.

Start up the Windows Server Migration Tools from Server Manager, Tools.image

This launches the Windows Server Migration Tools PowerShell window.image

Our SOURCE server here is the32 bit (X86)  Windows 2008 TS Gateway Server. The documentation tells us the correct values to use for the parameters /architecture and /OS to use.

SmigDeploy.exe /package /architecture X86 /os WS08 /path \\SourcerServer\c$\sysadmin

Now before you run this command be sure to go to the ServerMigrationTools folder as the UI fails to do that for you.

Also this is PowerShell so use .\ in front of the command otherwise you’ll get the error below.image

While you want this:image

Now you have also deployed the correct tools to the SOURCE server, our old legacy TS Gateway Server. Next we need to register these tools on the SOURCE Server to be able to use them. You might have gotten the message already you need PowerShell deployed on the SOURCE Server as documented.

If you have PowerShell, launch the console with elevated permissions (Runs As Administrator) and run the following command: .\SmigDeploy.exeimage

Congratulations you are now ready to use the Windows Server Migration Tools! That wasn’t so hard was it? Smile

Using the Windows Server Migration Tools To Migrate Local Users & Groups

To export the local users and groups from the source TS/RD Gateway server you start up the Windows Server Migration Tools on the SOURCE server (see the documentation for all ways to achieve this) and run the following PowerShell command:
Export-SmigServerSetting -User All  -Group –Path C:\SysAdmin\ExportMigUsersGroups –Verboseimage

As you can see I elected to migrate all user accounts not just the enabled or disabled ones. We’ll sort those out later. Also note the command will create the folder for you.

To import the local users and groups to the target RD Gateway server you start up the Windows Server Migration Tools on the Destination server (see the documentation) , i.e. our new Windows Server 2012 RD Gateway VM.

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and run the following PowerShell command:

Import-SmigServerSetting  -User Enabled  -Group -Path C:\SysAdmin\ExportMigUsersGroups -Verbose

Do note that the migrated user accounts will be disabled and have their properties set to "Next Logon". This means you will have to deal with this accordingly depending on the scenarios and communicate new passwords & action to take to the users.image

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Do note that the local groups have had the local or domain groups/users added by the import command. Pretty neat.image

You’re now ready for the next step. But that’s for another blog post.

x86 Windows Server 2008 TS Gateway Migration To x64 Windows Server 2012 RD Gateway


Introduction

I was working on a little project for a company that was (still) running TS Gateway on a 32 bit  x86) version Windows 2008. The reason they did not go for x64 at the time of deployment was that they then used Microsoft Virtual Server as their virtualization platform and had been for some years.

In a number of posts I’ll be discussing some of the steps we took. You are reading the first one.

  1. x86 Windows Server 2008 TS Gateway Migration To x64 Windows Server 2012 RD Gateway
  2. Installing & using the Windows Server Migration Tools To Migrate Local Users & Groups
  3. TS/RD Gateway Export & Import (Fixing Event ID 2002 “The policy and configuration settings could not be imported to the RD Gateway server "%1"" because they are associated with local computer groups on another RD Gateway server”)

In those early days of W2K8 they had not yet switched to Hyper-V. As an early adopter I was able to show the the reliability of Hyper-V, so later they did.

One of the drawbacks of using Microsoft Virtual Server was that they could not use x64 guest VMs and that’s how they ended up with x86, which was still available for a server OS for W2K8. Since then they have move to Hyper-V and now also run Window Server 2012. Happy customers! So after more than 5 years of service and to make sure they did not keep relying on aging technology it is time to move to Windows Server 2012 RD Gateway and reap the benefits of the latest OS.

The Migration

Their is no in place upgrade from a x86 to an x64 OS. So this has to be a migration. No worries this is supported. With some insight, creativity and experience you can make this happen. The process reasonably well documented on TechNet, but not perfectly, and your starting point is right here RD Gateway Migration: Migrating the RD Gateway Role Service. These docs are for Windows Server 2008 R2 but still work for Windows Server 2012. Another challenge was we needed to also migrate their custom website used for the employees to check whether their PC is still on and if not wake it up or start it up remotely.

There are some things to take care of and I’ll address these I some later blog posts but I want you to take to heart this message. While an in place upgrade of an 32 bit X86 operating system to X64 version of that OS is not possible that doesn’t mean you’re in  a pickle and will have to start over from scratch. For many scenario’s there are migration paths and this is just one example of them, or better two combined,TS Gateway and a Website.