Checking Host Integration Services Version on all Nodes of A Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V Cluster With PowerShell


It’s important to keep our Hyper-V cluster hosts and the virtual machines running on them up to date. Whilst we have great and free solutions to achieve this there are some things missing like centralized reporting on the Integration Services component version running on all of the nodes in a cluster and way to upgrade all the virtual machines to version running on the host. This post deals with the first issue.

Before we upgrade the Integration Services components on the virtual machines we always check if all nodes in the cluster are on the same version themselves. Sure this should not happen if you mange them right but my world isn’t perfect. So trust but verify.With cluster sizes now up to 64 nodes it’s ever more important to keep an eye on them. But even for smaller cluster the task of determining the Integration Services components manually via the GUI, event viewer and/or registry is rather tedious. Out of sync Integration Services components can be troublesome and cause many issues and if you have out of sync virtual machines, imagine the extra mess you’ll be in when even the cluster nodes are running different versions.

To make live easier I threw a little PowerShell script together to check the host Integration Services component version on all nodes of a Window Server 2012 Hyper-V Cluster With PowerShell. I’m far from a PowerShell guru, but you’ll see that you can do a lot of things  done even if you’re not. I’m sharing it here for you to use, adapt for your own needs and get some inspiration. It basically allows you to optionally pass an expected version of the IS components and a cluster name like this

CheckHyperVClusterHostsICVersion -Version 6.2.9200.16433 -cluster "MyClusterName"

It does the following:

  • It will list per Integration Services component version found on cluster nodes what version was found on what nodes. This gives you a nice overview. I hope this never becomes to much of a list in your clusters.
  • If you don’t specify a cluster it will try to connect to the cluster to which the host you’re running on belongs, if any.
  • If the host does not belong to a cluster it will just provide feedback on the IS version of that Hyper-V host you’re running the script on.

Here’s a screen shot of when you run this on a none clustered host, without Hyper-V installed:

image

This is the result of running it against a well maintained cluster without any parameters that has been updated with KB2770917:

image

The same but now with the expected version and cluster name passed as parameters

image

So, there you go, I hope you find it useful.

#===========================================================
# # Microsoft PowerShell Source File 
# 
# NAME:    CheckISCOnNodesOfHyperVCluster.ps1
# VERSION:    1.0.0.0

# AUTHOR:    Didier Van Hoye
# DATE :    17/11/2012
# 
# COMMENT:     This script is intended to be run 
#              against Windows Server 2012 and assumes
#            the use of PowerShell 3.0
#            The parameters are optional but if you
#            leave out some the remainder should be named.
# # =======================================================
 
cls
$ErrorActionPreference = "Stop"

 
function CheckHyperVClusterHostsICVersion
{
    Param
    (
        #Param help description
        [Version]
        $ExpectedISCVersion,
        #Param help description
        [String]
        $Cluster
    )

    Write-Host "This script will check the IS components on all nodes of a cluster." -ForegroundColor Green
 
    If ($ExpectedISCVersion) {Write-Host "You specified the expected IS component version to be $ExpectedISCVersion" -ForegroundColor Green}
    Else {Write-host "You did not specify an expected IS component version." -ForegroundColor Green}
    
    If ($Cluster)
    {
        Try
        {
            $ClusterObject= Get-Cluster -Name $Cluster
        }
        Catch
        {     
            Write-Host "We cannot contact the cluster you specified"
        }
    }
    Else
    {    
        write-Host "`n`n"
        Write-host "You did not specify a cluster to connect to. We'll use the cluster to which the node this script is running on belongs if any." -ForegroundColor Yellow
        write-Host "`n`n"
  
        Try
        {
            $ClusterObject = Get-Cluster
        }
  
        Catch
        {
            $LocalHost = $env:computername
            Write-Host
            Write-Host "The current node ($LocalHost) is not a member of a cluster. As a courtsey to you we'll check the IS components for current host" -foregroundcolor Magenta
            Write-Host
        }
 
    }
  
    If ($ClusterObject) {$ToCheck= "the nodes of cluster $ClusterObject"} Else { $ToCheck = "server $env:computername"}
 
    write-Host "Attempting to running Integration Components version check on" $ToCheck -ForegroundColor Green
    Write-Host


    If ($ClusterObject)
    {

        $ClusterNodes = Get-Clusternode -cluster $ClusterObject.Name
        
        #Declare an hashtable to hold all host/IS version values. The hosts are the key here.
        $HostISVersions = @{}
 
        foreach ($ClusterNode in $ClusterNodes)
        {
            Try
            {
                 $HostISVersions[$ClusterNode.Name]=Get-ItemProperty "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Virtualization\GuestInstaller\Version" | select -ExpandProperty Microsoft-Hyper-V-Guest-Installer
            }
            Catch
            {
            Write-Host "We could not determine the version of the Integration Services on this host, probably due to this not being a Hyper-V host" -ForegroundColor Orange
            Write-Host "We'll check this for you right now" -ForegroundColor Orange
            $HyperVFeature = Get-WindowsFeature Hyper-V
            If ($HyperVFeature.Installstate -eq "Installed")
            {
              Write-Host "Hyper-V seems to be installed on this node. Something else is wrong." -ForegroundColor Red
            }
            Else
            {
                Write-Host "Hyper-V is indeed not installed on this node." -ForegroundColor Orange
            }
            }
        }
         #Use GetEnumerator or thise sorting thing doesn't work out well on an hash tabel :-)
        $UniqueIcVersions = $HostISVersions.GetEnumerator() | Sort-Object -Property Value -Unique
 
        Write-Host "We've found " $UniqueIcVersions.count "versions on the" $HostISVersions.count "nodes of your cluster" $ClusterObject.Name
 
        ForEach ($IcVersion in $UniqueIcVersions )
        {
            $Counter = 1
            $IcVersionValue = $IcVersion.value
            "IC version " + $IcVersion.value + " is found in:"
            foreach ($Key in ($HostISVersions.GetEnumerator()| Where-Object { $_.value -eq $IcVersionValue}))
            {
                "`t" + "$Counter : " + $Key.Name
                $Counter= $Counter + 1
            }
 
            If ($ExpectedISCVersion)
            {
               
                $CompareVersions = ([Version]$IcVersion.Value).CompareTo([Version]$ExpectedISCVersion)
                        
                switch ($CompareVersions)
                {
                    0 {Write-Host "This version ($IcVersionValue) is equal to the expected version ($ExpectedISCVersion)." -ForegroundColor Green}
                    1 {Write-Host "This version ($IcVersionValue) is higher than the expected version ($ExpectedISCVersion). Please ensure all hosts run the same IC version level." -ForegroundColor Yellow}
                    -1 {Write-Host "This version ($IcVersionValue) is lower than the expected version ($ExpectedISCVersion). Please ensure all hosts run the same IC version level." -ForegroundColor Red}
                }
            }

        }
    }

    Else
    {
        Try
        {
            $HostIcVersion = Get-ItemProperty "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Virtualization\GuestInstaller\Version" | select -ExpandProperty Microsoft-Hyper-V-Guest-Installer
            Write-Host "The IS component version on server $localhost is $HostIcVersion"
            If ($ExpectedISCVersion)
            {
               
                   $CompareVersions = ([Version]$HostIcVersion).CompareTo([Version]$ExpectedISCVersion)
                        
                switch ($CompareVersions)
                {
                0 {Write-Host "This version ($HostIcVersion) is equal to the expected version ($ExpectedISCVersion)." -ForegroundColor Green}
                1 {Write-Host "This version ($HostIcVersion) is higher than the expected version ($ExpectedISCVersion). Please check if you need to downgrade your host or if the expected version is correct." -ForegroundColor Yellow}
                -1 {Write-Host "This version ($HostIcVersion) is lower than the expected version ($ExpectedISCVersion). Please check if you need to upgrade your host or if the expected version is correct." -ForegroundColor Red}
                }
            }
        }
        Catch
        {
            Write-Host "We could not determine the version of the Integration Services on this host, probably due to this not being a Hyper-V host" -ForegroundColor yellow
            Write-Host "We'll check this for you right now" -ForegroundColor yellow
            $HyperVFeature = Get-WindowsFeature Hyper-V
            If ($HyperVFeature.Installstate -eq "Installed")
            {
                Write-Host "Hyper-V seems to be installed on this node. Something else is wrong." -ForegroundColor Red
            }
            Else
            {
                Write-Host "Hyper-V is indeed not installed on this node." -ForegroundColor yellow
            }
        }
    }
}
 
CheckHyperVClusterHostsICVersion -Version 6.2.9200.16433 -cluster "MyClusterName"

KB2770917 Updating Host & Guest Integration Services Components – Most Current Version Depends on Guest OS


As after installing http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2770917 on Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V hosts the integration services components are upgraded from 6.2.9200.16384 to 6.2.9200.16433. Windows Server 2012 guest get that same upgrade and as such also the newer integration services components. The guest with older OS version needed a different approach. So I turned to all the great PowerShell support now available for Hyper-V to automate this. Pretty pleased with the results of our adventures in PowerShell scripting I let the script go on Hyper-V cluster dedicated to test & development. As such there are some virtual machines on there running Windows 2003 SP2 (X64) and Windows XP SP3 (x86).  Guess what, after running my script and verifying the integration services version I see that those VM still report version 6.2.9200.16384 . No update. Didn’t my new scripting achievement “take” on those older guests?

So I try the install manually and this is what I get:

clip_image001

 

Why is there no upgrade for these guests?  Are they not needed or do I have an issue? So I mount the ISO and dig around in the files to find a clue in the date:

clip_image001[10]

 

It looks like there are indeed no update components in there for Windows XP/ W2K3. So then I look at the following registry key on the host where I normally use the Microsoft-Hyper-V-Guest-Installer-Win6x-Package value to find out what integration services version my hosts are running:

image

 

Bingo, there it seems indicated that we indeed need version for XP/W2K3 and version for W2K8(R2)/W2K12 and Vista/Windows 7/Windows 8. Cool, but I had to check if this was indeed as it should be and I’m happy to confirm all is well. Ben Armstrong (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/virtual_pc_guy/) confirmed that this is how it should be. There was a update needed for backup that only applied to Windows 8 / Windows Server 2012 guests.  As this fix was in a common component for Windows Server 2008 and later they all got the update. But for the older OS versions this was not the case and hence no update is need. Which is reflected in all the above. In short, this means your XP SP3 & W2K3SP2 VMs are just fine running the version of the integration services and are not in any kind of trouble.

This does leave me with an another task. I was planning to do enhancements to my script like feedback on progress, some logging, some better logic for clustered and non clustered environments, but now I have to also address this possibility and verify using the registry keys on the host which IC version I should check against per OS version. Checking against just for the one related to the host isn’t good enough Smile.

Windows 8 Hyper-V Improved Integration Services Setup


In Windows 8 Beta there is a nice and functional improvement in Hyper-V Manager when you want to install or upgrade the Integration Services. It shows you what version (if any) is installed and if an upgrade is needed or not. Until now it just “mentioned” that “a previous” (no version, could be the latest one) were installed and happily let you reinstall them needed or not. Begs the questions how does this all deal with “corrupted” integration services if such a thing exists. I, personally, have never seen it. Uninstall/reinstall I guess when you come across it as I don’t know of a forced/repair install option.

Walkthrough of The Improved Integration Services Setup

In the Virtual Machine console navigate to Action and select “Insert Integration Services Setup Disk”

image

In the Virtual Machine console you’ll see that inserting the integration services disk succeeded.

image

Like before, if the setup process doesn’t start automatically just navigate to the DVD and kick start it yourself.

10

 

As you can see below it now shows what version (if any) of the integration services is already installed and asks you if you want to update. In the example below you can see it has the Windows 2008 R2 SP1 version of the integration services. This is as expected as this machine (a W2K3R2SP2 guest) was imported from a Hyper-V cluster running that Windows 2008 R2 SP1.

Integration Comopnents

 

You click OK and the installation process for the integration services will start.

02

03

 

When the installation is done you’ll be notified that the virtual machines needs to restart.

image

 

The server will reboot and if you then try to install the integration services again it will notify you that it has already the correct version of the integration tools running.

09

 

Remarks

If you hit an error in the Beta of Windows 8 Hyper-V I advise two things I have experienced myself in the labs.

  1. Make sure you have enough disk space. I had one test server that had only a few MB left on the C partition and that bit me Smile
  2. Make sure you do it after a clean reboot. Just to make sure you have no pending hardware detection/installs lingering around. I experienced this one on a Windows 2003 R2 SP2 guest. Error code 1618, yup that means Another installation is already in progress.

04

Integration Services Version Check Via Hyper-V Integration/Admin Event Log


I’ve written before (see "Key Value Pair Exchange WMI Component Property GuestIntrinsicExchangeItems & Assumptions") on the need to & ways with PowerShell to determine the version of the integration services or integration components running in your guests. These need to be in sync with the one running on the hosts. Meaning that all the hosts in a cluster should be running the same version as well as the guests.

During an upgrade with a service pack this get the necessary attention and scripts (PowerShell) are written to check versions and create reports and normally you end up with a pretty consistent cluster. Over time virtual machines are imported, inherited from another cluster of created on a test/developer host and shipped to production. I know, I know, this isn’t something that should happen, but I don’t always have the luxury of working in a perfect world.

Enough said. This means you might end up with guests that are not running the most recent version of the integration tools. Apart from checking manually in the guest (which is tedious, see my blog "Upgrading a Hyper-V R2 Cluster to Windows 2008 R2 SP1" on how to do this) or running previously mentioned script you can also check the Hyper-V event log.

Another way to spot virtual machines that might not have the most recent version of the integration tools is via the Hyper-V logs. In Server Manager you drill down in the “Diagnostics” to, “Event Viewer” and than navigate your way through  "Applications and Services Logs", "Microsoft", "Windows" until you hit “Hyper-V-Integration

image

Take a closer look and you’ll see the warning about 2 guests having an older version of the integration tools installed.

image

As you can see it records a warning for every virtual machine whose integration services are older than the host running Hyper-V. This makes it easy to grab a list of guest needing some attention. The down side is that you need to check all hosts, not to bad for a small cluster but not very efficient on the larger ones.

So just remember this as another way to spot virtual machines that might not have the most recent version of the integration tools. It’s not a replacement for some cool PowerShell scripting or the BPA tools, but it is a handy quick way to check the version for all the guests on a host when you’re in a hurry.

It might be nice if integration services version management becomes easier in the future. Meaning a built-in way to report on the versions in the guests and an easier way to deploy these automatically if there not part of a service pack (this is the case when the guest OS and the host OS differ or when you can’t install the SP in the guest for some application compatibility reason). You can do this in bulk using SCVMM and of cause Scripting this with PowerShell comes to the rescue here again, especially when dealing with hundreds of virtual machines in multiple large clusters. Orchestration via System Center Orchestrator can also be used. Integration with WSUS would be another nice option, for those that don’t have Configuration Manager or Orchestrator but that’s not supported as far as I know for now.