Concluding My Summit, Conference & Community Engagements for 2014


After Redmond (MVP Global Summit 2014), which was a great experience I flew to Berlin to attend and speak at the Microsoft Technical Summit 2014 on “What’s New In Windows Server 2012 R2 Clustering”. Germany has a seriously engaged ITPro & Dev scene, that’s for sure, and the session room was packed! Afterwards some interesting questions popped up in the hallways. That’s great as question really make us think about technologies and solutions from other view points and perspectives.

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After Berlin I was off to Experts Live 2014 in Ede (The Netherlands) where I presented on “The capable & Scalable Cloud OS”. The talk went well and I had a great crowd attending with whom I had some great chats after the session.

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That concluded the third leg of my international road tour where I invest in myself, the community & the people I work with. Never ever stop learning Smile. Normally this also concludes my traveling schedule for 2014 unless I’m needed/requested somewhere to help out. Being an MVP is about sharing in the community. The only way to prosper is to share the knowledge, experience and the wealth. It provides for a healthy ecosystem from which we all reap the benefits. This should be promoted and facilitated. There is too much expertise & knowledge not being leveraged due to the fact it’s economically unfeasible, and that’s a waste when people are screaming for IT skills. In a war for talent, any waste is surely very counter productive?

Hyper-V Guest Protected Network Testing Tip


I’ve been pinged a few times over the years with people saying that the new protected network feature does not work for them. This setting is set per vNIC of the virtual machine.

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The issue lies in how & what people test, bar any number of other reasons why a live migration might not start or complete.  What people tend to do is disable a NIC to which the vSwitch is connected. But a Protected Network is about media sense loss detection of network disconnects and this requires the NIC to be actually there and enabled. Remember, we’re talking about the NIC on the host connected to the virtual switch. A physical link failure here, meaning that the virtual switch the protected virtual network adapter no longer has network connectivity, will lead to all the VMs with  the protected network enabled do be live migrated to another node in the cluster that still has a connected virtual switch for the same network.  The latter is to avoid  senseless virtual machine migrations to other nodes that might also have lost connectivity due to a failed physical switch.

So the point is that testing by disabling the NIC in the OS will not do. You need to unplug the cables to the virtual switch or disable the port on the switch or even shutdown the switch (a bit drastic).

Do note that it can take a little time for the live migration to kick in,  it varies a bit, but it beats having to wait for the issue to be resolved. You’ll see event id 1255 logged when the VMs lose network connectivity:image

In this day and age with NIC teaming to redundant switches & the fact that you might be using converged networking these tests aren’t as simple as you might think. Also don’t pull out all if the cables used for clustering if you want the cluster to be able to help you out here with a live migration. Because when the other cluster nodes can’t talk to the node your testing in any way it will be kicked out of the cluster, the VMs will go down, be moved to another node and started. This might seem obvious but if you a are using a teamed 10Gbps solution in a converged setup this might cause exactly that.

Another thing to note is that if you have a virtual switch with a dedicated backup network exposed to hosts & VMs that can tolerate down time you might want to disable protected networks on that vNIC as you don’t want to live migrate the VMs of when that network has an issue. It all depends on your needs & tastes.

Last but not least please behave, and don’t do anything silly in production when testing this. Be careful in your testing.

Golden Nuggets: Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Cluster CSV Placement Policy


Some enhancements only become truly evident to people when they see them in action. For many features this means something need to go wrong before they kick in. Others are more visible during normal operations. This is the case with the CSV enhancements in Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Clustering.

One golden nugget here is the CSV placement policy (which really shines in combination with SOFS/Storage Spaces). This will spread ownership of the CSV amongst the cluster nodes to ensure a balanced distribution. In a failover cluster, one node is the “coordinator node” (owner) for a CSV. The coordinator node owns the physical disk resource that is associated with a logical unit (LUN). All I/O operations for the File System on that LUN are are through the coordinator node. In previous versions there is no automatic rebalancing of coordinator node assignment. This means that all LUNs could potentially be owned by the same node. In storage spaces & SOFS scenarios becomes even more important.

The benefits

  • It helps all nodes carry their share of the workload as it load balances the disk I/O.
  • Failovers of CSV owners are potentially quicker and more predictable/consistent as an even distribution ensures that no one node owns a disproportionate number of CSVs.
  • When losing storage access the number of CSVs that are in redirected mode is potentially less as they are evenly distributed. In an unbalanced cluster it could be for all of them in a worse case scenario.
  • When using SOFS with Storage Spaces it makes sure the Storage Spaces Ownership is distributed fairly.

When does it happen

  • Each time a node leaves or joins the cluster. This means you don’t need to intervene manually or via PowerShell to get an even distribution. This goes for both exiting nodes as when adding a new node. The new node will get a CSV assigned if there is any on surplus on one of the existing nodes.
  • The process also works when you start a failover cluster when it has shut down.

When customers see this in action (it’s most obvious when then add a node as then they are normally watching) they generally smile as the cluster does it job getting  the best possible results out of their hardware.

Hot add/remove of network adapters and enabling device naming in Windows Server Hyper-V


One of the cool new features in Window Server vNext Hyper-V (in Technical Preview at the moment of writing) is that you gain the ability to hot add and remove NICs.  That might sound not to important to the non initiated in the fine art of virtualization & clouds. But it is. You see anything you can do to a VM configuration wise that does not require downtime is good. That’s what helps shift the needle of high availability to that holey grail of continuous availability.

On top of that the names of the network adapters are now exposed to the guest. Which is also great. It’s become lot easier to automate the VM network configuration.

Hot adding NICs can be done via the GUI and PoSh.

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But naming the network adapter seems a PowerShell only game for now (nothing hard, no sweat). This can be done during creation of the network adapter. Here I add a NIC to VM RAGNAR connected to the ISCSI-GUEST switch & named ISCSI.

Add-VMNetworkAdapter –VMName RAGNAR –SwitchName ISCSI-GUEST –Name ISCSI

Now I want this name to be reflected into the VM’s NCI configuration properties. This is done by enabling device naming. You can do this via the GUI or PoSh.

Set-VMNetworkAdapter –VMName RAGNAR –Name ISCSI –Devicenaming On

That’s it.

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So now let’s play with our existing network adapter “Network Adapter” which connects our Hyper-V guests to the LAN via the HYPER-V-GUESTS switch? Can you rename it?  Yes, you can. In PoSh run this:

Rename-VMNetworkAdapter –VMName RAGNAR –Name “Network Adapter” –NewName “LAN”

And that’s it. If you refresh the setting of your VM or reopen it you’ll see the name change.

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The one thing that I see in the Tech Preview is that I need to reboot the VM to see the Name change reflected inside the VM in the NIC configuration under advance properties, called “Hyper-V Network Adapter Name”. Existing one show their old name and new one are empty until then.

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Two important characteristics to note about enabling device naming

You notice that one can edit this field in NIC configuration of the VM but it doesn’t move up the stack into the settings of the VM. Security wise this seems logical to me and it’s not intended to work. It’s a GUI limitation that the field cannot be disabled for editing but no one can try and  be “funny” by renaming the ethernet adapter in the VMs settings via the guest Winking smile

Do note that this is not exactly the same a Consistent Device Naming in Windows 2012 or later. It’s not reflected in the name of the NIC in the GUI, these are still Ethernet, Ethernet 2, … Enable device naming is mainly meant to enable identifying the adapter assigned to the VM inside the VM, mainly for automation. You can name the NIC in the Guest whatever works best for you and you’ll never lose the correlations between the Network adapter in your VM settings and the Hyper-V Network Adapter name in the NIC configuration properties. In that respect is a bit more solid/permanent even if some one found it funny to rename all vNICs to random names you’re still OK with this feature.

That’s it off, you go! Download the Technical Preview bits from MSDN, start exploring and learning. Knowledge is seldom a bad thing Winking smile

The Hyper V Amigos Showcast Episode 6: Storage Spaces


Everybody is very busy and I’m a bit tires but here’s the 6th episode of the Hyper-V Amigos show cast. In this episode we get to play a bit with storage spaces in Carsten’s lab.

As always we had a lot of fun doing so and thanks to Carsten Rachfahl and the assistance of Kerstin (his charming wife, also an MVP, in Office 365) we could simulate hardware failures & film them for you!

 

Carsten & I discuss several scenarios and what’s happening during failovers. Carsten is assisting customers with this a lot so he has some of the most varied experience with storage spaces and SOFS out there!  Interesting stuff and for people who haven’t even looked at Windows Server 2012 or later yet a wake up call to start as the world is not limited to what we once knew. It’s not your daddy’s Windows anymore Winking smile

I hope you enjoy it and we’re already planning for the next one!

Hot Add & Remove Static Memory in a Hyper-V vNext Virtual Machine


One of the very nice and handy new capabilities in Windows Server vNext Hyper-V (Windows Server 2015 or Windows Server 10?) is the fact that you can now hot add or remove memory from a virtual machine with a fixed amount of memory. Another step towards continuous availability.

Here’s a test virtual machine RAGNAR running the Technology Preview bits on my test cluster. As you can see it has 1024MB of fixed memory. And Dynamic memory is not enabled.

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I can simply adjust this upward by typing in the value and clicking “Apply”

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and downwards in the same way

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Cool huh!

On top of this to make sure you’re not adding memory needlessly when someone says they need more memory for their VM you can see the memory demand now in the GUI. Both in Hyper-V Manager and in the Failover Clustering GUI.

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The technical preview of Windows vNext is looking good even in this early stage and I have no doubt it’s only going to get better Open-mouthed smile.

Some things to note

  • It’s configurable via PowerShell so you can start dreaming of script to query memory assignment & demand and use that output to redistribute memory available on the host amongst the VMs …

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  • Both Hyper-V host and guest have to run vNext (Technical Preview)
  • The guest has to be a generation 2 VM
  • It’s still virtualization technology and not magic, so if you try to assign more memory than available you’ll get a warning Winking smile

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Windows Server 2012 R2 Clustering brings improved CSV diagnosability


Cluster Shared Volumes (CSV) have can go into different redirected access modes for several reasons. Now a lot of people get (or got) worried about seeing “redirected access” in the GUI. Most of the time however this is due to normal operations such as backups or maintenance (defragmentation) not only losing disk access.

To remediate unneeded troubleshooting, sometimes leading to real issues, calls to MSFT support and so forth it was hidden from the Failover Clustering GUI in Windows 2012 R2. OK, so goal achieved but how do we now troubleshoot and view redirected access that might indicate the presence of real issues? The answer to that is the Get-ClusterSharedVolumeState PowerShell cmdlet. It displays the state of the CSVs on a per node basis for a cluster. You’ll see the type of the IO (Direct, File System Redirected and Block Redirected), if it’s completely unavailable  as well as the reason.

This is what the output looks like on a two node cluster where node A has lost it’s storage path or paths (MPIO) to the CSV. You’ll see that both CSV are in redirected access. Not only that but you can see what type (block redirected) and why (no disk connectivity).

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Pretty neat and clear. I love this functionality by the way and It’s why I’m leveraging 10Gbps Ethernet extensively to make sure that CSV traffic get’s the bandwidth & latency to handle what it has to. If you realize it leverages SMB3 which provides SMB Multichannel and SMB Direct you know it will get the job done for you in your time of need.

While this is happening in the GUI you’ll see this

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Nothing is going on … it would seem so a bit of monitoring and alerting would be of use here. The good news is finding out what’s up is very straight forward now.

Now there is still a case where you’ll see that the CSV is in redirected access mode and that when you’ve put it in there yourself via the GUI

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or via PowerShell for maintenance reasons.

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As you can see the Icon has change to a networked disk one and it states “Redirected Access”. With Get-ClusterSharedVolumeState the output looks like this.

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You’ll always see warnings in the event logs.

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So monitor those with SCOM or another tool that suits your taste and you’ll be in good shape to react when it’s needed and you now know how to find out what’s going on.