Defragmenting your CSV Windows 2012 R2 Style with Raxco Perfect Disk 13 SP2


When it comes to defragmenting CSV it seemed we took a step back when it comes to support from 3rd party vendors. While Windows provides for a great toolset to defragment a CSV it seemed to have disappeared form 3r party vendor software. Even from the really good Raxco Perfect disk. They did have support for this with Windows 2008 R2 and I even mentioned that in a blog.

If you need information on how to defragment a CSV in Windows 2012 R2, look no further.There is an absolutely fantastic blog post on the subject How to Run ChkDsk and Defrag on Cluster Shared Volumes in Windows Server 2012 R2, by Subhasish Bhattacharya one of the program managers in the Clustering and High Availability product group. He’s a great guy to talk shop to by the way if you ever get the opportunity to do so. One bizarre thing is that this must be the only place where PowerShell (Repair-ClusterSharedVolume cmdlet) is depreciated in lieu of chkdsk.

3rd party wise the release of Raxco Perfect Disk 13 SP2 brought back support for defragmenting CSV.

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I don’t know why it took them so long but the support is here now. It looks like they struggled to get the CSVFS (the way CSV are now done since Windows Server 2012) supported. Whilst add it, they threw in support for ReFS by the way. This is the first time I’ve ever seen this. Any way it’s here and that’s good because I have a hard time accepting that any product (whatever it does) supports Hyper-V if it can’t handle CSV, not if you want to be taken seriously anyway. No CSV support equals = do not buy list in my book.

Here’s a screenshot of Perfect disk defragmenting away. One of the CSV LUNs in my lab is a SSD and the other a HDD.

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Notice that in Global Settings you can tweak the behavior when defragmenting optimization of various drive types, including CSVFS but you just have to leave the default on unless you like manual labor or love PowerShell that much you can’t forgo any opportunity to use it Winking smile

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Perfect disk cannot detect what kind of disks you have behind the CSV LUN so you might want to change the optimization method if you’re running SSD instead of HHD.

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I’d love for Raxco to comment on this or point to some guidance.

What would also be beneficial to a lot of customers is guidance on defragmentation on the different auto-tiering storage arrays. That would make for a fine discussion I think.

Migrate an old file server to a transparent failover file server with continuous availability


This is not a step by step “How to” but we’ll address some thing you need to do and the tips and tricks that might make things a bit smoother for you.

1) Disable Short file names & Strip existing old file names

Never mind that this is needed to be able to do continuous availability on a file share cluster. You should have done this a long time ago. For one is enhances performance significantly. It also make sure that no crappy apps that require short file names to function can be introduced into the environment. While I’m an advocate for mutual agreements there are many cases where you need to protect users, the business against itself. Being to much of a politician as a technologist can be very bad for the company due to allowing bad workarounds and technology debt to be introduced. Stand tall!

Read up on this here Windows Server 2012 File Server Tip: Disable 8.3 Naming (and strip those short names too. Next to Jose’s great blog read Fsutil 8dot3name on how to do this.

If you still have applications that depend on short file names you need to isolate and virtualize them immediately. I feel sorry for you that this situation exists in your environment and I hope you get the necessary means to deal with swiftly and decisively by getting rid of these applications. Please see The Zombie ISV® to be reminded why.

Some tips:

  • Only use the /F switch if it’s a non system disk and you can afford to do so as you’re moving the data LUN to a new server anyone. Otherwise you might run into issues. See the below example.image
  • If you stumble on path that are too long, intervene. Talk to the owners. We got people to reduce “Human Resources Planning And Evaluations” sub folder & file names reduced to HRMPlanEval. You get the gist, trim them down.
  • You’ll have great success on most files & folders but if they are open. Schedule a maintenance window to make sure you can run without anyone connected to the shares (Stop LanManServer during that maintenance window).image
  • Also verify no other processes are locking any files or folders (anti virus, backups, sync tools etc.)

2) Convert MBR disks to GPT if you can

With ever growing amounts of data to store and protect this makes sense. I’m not saying you need to start doing 64TB disks today but making sure you can grown beyond 2TB is smart. It doesn’t cost anything when you start out with GPT disks from the start.  If you have older LUNs you might want to use the migration as an opportunity to convert MBR LUNs to GPT. That means copying the data and all NTFS permissions.

Please see  NTFS Permissions On A File Server From Hell Saved By SetACL.exe & SetACL Studio for some tools that might help you out when you run into NTFS/ACL permissions and for parsing logs during this operation.

Here’s a useful Robocopy command to start out with:

ROBOCOPY L:\ V:\ /MIR /SEC /Z /R:2 /W:1 /V /TS /FP /NP /XA:SH /MT:16 /XD "System Volume Information" *RECYCLE* /LOG:"D:\RoboCopyLogs\MBR2GPTLUNL2V.txt"

3) Dump the existing shares on the old file sever into a text file for documentation an use on the new file server

Pre Windows Server 2012 the new SMB Cmdlets don’t work, but no fear, we have some other tools to use. Using NET SHARE does work and with you can also show the hidden and system share but the layout is a bit of a mess. I prefer to use.

Get-WmiObject –class Win32_Share > C:\temp\OldFileServerShares

It’s fast, complete and the layout is very user friendly. Which is what I need for easy use with PowerShell on the W2K12R2  file server. Some of you might say, what about the share security settings. 1) We’re going to cluster so exporting these from the registry doesn’t work and 2) you should have kept this plain vanilla and done security via the NFTS permissions on the folder structure only. But hey I’m a nice guy, so here’s a link to a community PowerShell script if you need to find out the share permissions: http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/List-Share-Permissions-83f8c419 I do however encourage you to use this time to consider just using security on NFTS.

4) Create the clustered file shares

Amongst the many gems in Windows Server 2012 R2 are the new SMB PowerShell Cmdlets. They are a simple and great way to create clustered files shares. Read up on these SMB Share Cmdlets and especially New-SmbShare

When we’ve unmapped the LUNs from the old file server and exposed them to the new file server cluster you’re ready to go. You can even reorganize the Shares, consolidate to less but bigger LUNs and, by just adapting the path to the share in the script make sure the users are not confused or nee to learn new shares and adapt how & what they connect to them. Here it goes:

New-SmbShare -Name "TEST2" -path "T:\Shares\TEST2" -fullaccess Everyone -EncryptData $True -FolderEnumerationMode AccessBased -ConcurrentUserLimit 0 -ScopeName TF-FS-MIG

First and foremost, this is where the good practice of not micro managing file hare permissions will pay back big time. If you have done security via NTFS permissions with AG(U)DLP principle to your folder structure granting should be breeze right?

Before you ask, no you can’t do the old trick of importing the registry export of the shares and their security settings form the old file server when you’re going to cluster the file shares. That might sound bad but with some preparation and the PowerShell I demonstrated above you’ll find it easy enough.

5) Recuperate old file server name (Optional)

After you have decommissioned the old file server you could use a cluster alias to keep the old file server UNC path. This has the drawback you will fall back to connecting to the SMB shares via NTLM as aliases don’t support Kerberos authentication. But there is another trick. Once you got rid of the old server object in AD you can rename. If you can do this you’ll be able to keep Kerberos for authentication.

So after you’ve gotten rid of the old server in Active Directory go to the file server role. Select properties and rename it to recuperate the old files server name.

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Now look at the resources tab. Right click and select the properties tab of “Server Name”. Rename the DNS Name. That will update the server name and the DNS record. This will cause the role to go down temporarily.

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Right click and select the properties tab of “File Server”. Rename the UNC path to reflect the older file server name.

image For good measure and to test everything works: stop and restart the cluster role, connect to the shares and voila live should be good. Users can access the transparent failover file server like they used to do with the old non cluster file server and they don’t sacrifice Kerberos to be able to do so!

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Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed the tips and pointers on migrating an old file server to a  Windows Server 2012 R2 file share cluster. Remember that these tips apply for various permutations of P2V, V2V as well as for P2P migrations.

SMB 3, ODX, Windows Server 2012 R2 & Windows 8.1 perform magic in file sharing for both corporate & branch offices


SMB 3 for Transparent Failover File Shares

SMB 3 gives us lots of goodies and one of them is Transparent Failover which allows us to make file shares continuously available on a cluster. I have talked about this before in Transparent Failover & Node Fault Tolerance With SMB 2.2 Tested (yes, that was with the developer preview bits after BUILD 2011, I was hooked fast and early) and here Continuously Available File Shares Don’t Support Short File Names – "The request is not supported" & “CA failure – Failed to set continuously available property on a new or existing file share as Resume Key filter is not started.”

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This is an awesome capability to have. This also made me decide to deploy Windows 8 and now 8.1 as the default client OS. The fact that maintenance (it the Resume Key filter that makes this possible) can now happen during day time and patches can be done via Cluster Aware Updating is such a win-win for everyone it’s a no brainer. Just do it. Even better, it’s continuous availability thanks to the Witness service!

When the node running the file share crashes, the clients will experience a somewhat long delay in responsiveness but after 10 seconds the continue where they left off when the role has resumed on the other node. Awesome! Learn more bout this here Continuously Available File Server: Under the Hood and SMB Transparent Failover – making file shares continuously available.

Windows Clients also benefits from ODX

But there is more it’s SMB 3 & ODX that brings us even more goodness. The offloading of read & write to the SAN saving CPU cycles and bandwidth. Especially in the case of branch offices this rocks. SMB 3 clients who copy data between files shares on Windows Server 2012 (R2) that has storage an a ODX capable SAN get the benefit that the transfer request is translated to ODX by the server who gets a token that represents the data. This token is used by Windows to do the copying and is delivered to the storage array who internally does all the heavy lifting and tell the client the job is done. No more reading data form disk, translating it into TCP/IP, moving it across the wire to reassemble them on the other side and write them to disk.

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To make ODX happen we need a decent SAN that supports this well. A DELL Compellent shines here. Next to that you can’t have any filter drives on the volumes that don’t support offloaded read and write. This means that we need to make sure that features like data deduplication support this but also that 3rd party vendors for anti-virus and backup don’t ruin the party.

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In the screenshot above you can see that Windows data deduplication supports ODX. And if you run antivirus on the host you have to make sure that the filter driver supports ODX. In our case McAfee Enterprise does. So we’re good. Do make sure to exclude the cluster related folders & subfolders from on access scans and schedules scans.

Do not run DFS Namespace servers on the cluster nodes. The DfsDriver does not support ODX!

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The solution is easy, run your DFS Namespaces servers separate from your cluster hosts, somewhere else. That’s not a show stopper.

The user experience

What it looks like to a user? Totally normal except for the speed at which the file copies happen.

Here’s me copying an ISO file from a file share on server A to a file share on server B from my Windows 8.1 workstation at the branch office in another city, 65 KM away from our data center and connected via a 200Mbps pipe (MPLS).

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On average we get about 300 MB/s or 2.4 Gbps, which “over” a 200Mbps WAN is a kind of magic. I assure you that they’re not complaining and get used to this quite (too) fast Winking smile.

The IT Pro experience

Leveraging SMB 3 and ODX means we avoid that people consume tons of bandwidth over the WAN and make copying large data sets a lot faster. On top of that the CPU cycles and bandwidth on the server are conserved for other needs as well. All this while we can failover the cluster nodes without our business users being impacted. Continuous to high availability, speed, less bandwidth & CPU cycles needed. What’s not to like?

Pretty cool huh! These improvements help out a lot and we’ve paid for them via software assurance so why not leverage them? Light up your IT infrastructure and make it shine.

What’s stopping you?

So what are your plans to leverage your software assurance benefits? What’s stopping you? When I asked that I got a couple of answers:

  • I don’t have money for new hardware. Well my SAN is also pré Windows 2012 (DELL Compellent SC40 controllers. I just chose based on my own research not on what VARs like to sell to get maximal kickbacks Winking smile. The servers I used are almost 4 years old but fully up to date DELL PowerEdge R710’s, recuperated from their duty as Hyper-V hosts. These server easily last us 6 years and over time we collected some spare servers for parts or replacement after the support expires. DELL doesn’t take away your access to firmware &drivers like some do and their servers aren’t artificially crippled in feature set.
  • Skills? Study, learn, test! I mean it, no excuse!
  • Bad support from ISV an OEMs for recent Windows versions are holding you back? Buy other brands, vote with your money and do not accept their excuses. You pay them to deliver.

As IT professionals we must and we can deliver. This is only possible as the result of sustained effort & planning. All the labs, testing, studying helps out when I’m designing and deploying solutions. As I take the entire stack into account in designs and we do our due diligence, I know it will work. The fact that being active in the community also helps me know early on what vendors & products have issues and makes that we can avoid the “marchitecture” solutions that don’t deliver when deployed. You can achieve this as well, you just have to make it happen. That’s not too expensive or time consuming, at least a lot less than being stuck after you spent your money.

Copy Cluster Roles Hyper-V Cluster Migration Fails at Final Step with error Virtual Machine Configuration ‘VM01′ failed to register the virtual machine with the virtual machine service


I was working on a migration of a nice two node Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V cluster to Windows Server 2012 R2. The cluster consist out of 2 DELL R610 servers and a DELL  MD3200 shared SAS disk array for the shared storage. It runs all the virtual machines with infrastructure roles etc. It’s a Cluster In A Box like set up. This has been doing just fine for 18 months but the need for features in Windows Server 2012 R2 became too much to resists. As the hardware needs to be recuperated and we have a maintenance windows we use the copy cluster roles scenario that we have used so many times before with great success. It’s the Perform an in-place migration involving only two servers scenario documented on TechNet and as described in one of my previous blogs Migrating a Hyper-V Cluster to Windows 2012 R2 for your convenience.

Virtual Machine Configuration ‘VM01′ failed to register the virtual machine with the virtual machine service

As the source host was running on Windows Server 2012 we could have done the live migration scenario but the down time would be minimal and there is a maintenance window. So we chose this path.

So we performed a good health check. of the source cluster and made sure we had no snapshots left hanging around. Yes it’s supported now for this migration scenario but I like to have as few moving parts as possible during a migration.

It all went smooth like silk. After shutting down the VMs on the source cluster node, bringing the CSV off line (and un-presenting the LUN from the source node for good measure), we present that LUN to the target host. We brought the CSV on line and when that was completed successfully we were ready to bring the virtual machines on line and that failed …

Log Name:      Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-High-Availability-Admin
Source:        Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-High-Availability
Date:          4/02/2014 19:26:41
Event ID:      21102
Task Category: None
Level:         Error
Keywords:     
User:          SYSTEM
Computer:      VM01.domain.be
Description:
‘Virtual Machine Configuration VM01′ failed to register the virtual machine with the virtual machine management service.

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Let’s dive into the other event logs. On the host the application security and system event log are squeaky clean. The Hyper-V event logs are pretty empty or clean to except for these events in the Hyper-V-VMMS Admin log.

Log Name:      Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-VMMS-Admin
Source:        Microsoft-Windows-Hyper-V-VMMS
Date:          4/02/2014 19:26:40
Event ID:      13000
Task Category: None
Level:         Error
Keywords:     
User:          SYSTEM
Computer:      VM01.domain.be
Description:
User ‘NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM’ failed to create external configuration store at ‘C:\ClusterStorage\HyperVStorage\VM01′: The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed.. (0x800706FD)

 

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Bingo. It must be the fact that no domain controller is available. It’s completely self contained cluster and both domain controller virtual machines are highly available and reside on the CSV. Now the CSV does come on line without a DC since Windows Server 2012 so that’s not the issue. it’s the process of registering the VMs that fails without a DC in an Active Directory environment.

Getting passed this issue

There are multiple ways to resolve this and move ahead with our cluster migration. As the environment is still fully functional on the source cluster I just removed a DC virtual machine from high availability on the cluster. I shut it down and exported it. I than copied it over to the node of the new cluster  (we’re going to nuke the source host afterwards and install W2K12R2, so we moved it to the new host where it could stay) where I put it on local storage and imported it. For this is used the “Register the virtual machine in-place option”. I did not make it high available.

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After verifying that we could ping the DC and it was up and running well we tried the final phase of the migration again. It went as smooth as we have come to expect!

Other options would have been to host the DC virtual machine on a laptop or other server. If you could no longer get to the the DC for export & import or heck even a shared nothing migration depending on your environment can help you out of this pickle. A restore from backup would also work. But here in that 2 node all in one cluster our approach was fast and efficient.

So there you go. Tip to remember. Virtualizing domain controllers is fully supported, no worries there but you need to make sure that if you have a dependency on a DC you don’t have the DC depending on that dependency. It’s chicken an egg thing.

Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2


Introduction

In this blog series we’ll walk you through the process of migrating a Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster in another Active Directory domain. You are now reading part 2.

  1. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 1
  2. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2

The source W2K8R2 Hyper-V cluster is a production environment. To test the procedure for the migration we created a new CSV on the source cluster with some highly available test virtual machines with production like network configurations (multi homed virtual machined). This allows us to demonstrate the soundness of the process on one CSV before we tackle the 4 production CSVs.

We left off in part 1 with the virtual machines on the CSV LUN we are going to migrate shutdown. We’ll now continue the process of moving the CSV LUN from the old Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 cluster to the new Windows Server 2012 R2 cluster. After that we can import them and, start them up, test that all is well and finally make them highly available in the cluster. Don’t forget the upgrade the integration components when all is done.

Removing the CSV LUN from the the source W2K8R2 Hyper-V Cluster

Just leave the VMs where they are on the LUN, un-present that LUN from the old source W2K8R2 Hyper-V cluster and present it to the new W2K12R2 Hyper-V Cluster. In our case, with a dealing with a cluster so we use a CSV. So when the LUN is presented and added to the cluster don’t forget to add it to the CSVs. Well

In Failover Cluster Manager bring the CSV that you are migrating off line. Make sure you have the correct one (green circles/arrow) to avoid down time in production.

imageWhen asked if you’re sure, confirm this

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The CSV will be brought of line, which you can verify in Disk Management

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We’re going to do our clean up already. You could wait until after the migration but we want the old cluster to look as clean and healthy for the operations people as possible so they don’t worry. So we go and remove this LUN from Cluster Shared Volumes.

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Which you’ll need to confirm

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after which your disk will be move to available storage

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Do note that if you do this it brings the LUN back on line. As it’s still a clustered diskand  there is no IO (all VMS are shut down) that’s OK. We’ll remove it form available cluster storage (“Delete” isn’t a bad as it sounds in this context)

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The storage will be gone form the cluster and off line in disk manager.

On the SAN / Shared Storage

We create a SAN snapshot for fall back purposes (we throw it away after all has gone well). If you have this option I highly advise you to do so. It’s not easy to move back form Windows Server 2012 R2 to W2K8R2 in the unlikely event you would need to do so. It also protects the VM against any errors & mishaps that might occur, if you understand how to use the snapshot to recover.

On the SAN we un map the CSV LUN from the old cluster. We could wait but this is an extra protection against two clusters seeing the same storage.

On the SAN we map that CSV LUN to the new cluster. It will appear in disk manager.

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We add this disk to the new cluster

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We add it to the CSV on the new cluster, which brings it on line.

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It uses the default naming convention of clustered disks. So this is the moment to change the name if you need or want to do so.

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So now it’s time to go Hyper-V Manager and do the actual import.

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Navigate to the folder where you Hyper-V Virtual Machine Configuration lives. This location can be central for all VM or individual per VM, depending on how the virtual machines were organized on the old source cluster. In our example it is the latter. Also note that we only have one CSV involved per VM here, so it easy. Otherwise you will need to move multiple CSVs across together, all the ones the VM or VMs depend on.

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It has found a virtual machine to import.

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This is important, select “Register the virtual machine in-place (use the existing unique ID)”

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Click “Next” to confirm the your actions

If anything about your virtual machine is not compatible with your host, the GUI allows you to make fix this. Here we have to change the correct virtual switch as they are different from the source host.

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When done, just click next and in a blink of the eye your machine will be imported. You can start it up right now to see if all went well.

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As in Windows Server 2012 (R2) we can add running virtual machines to the cluster for high availability that’s the final step.

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We can import all virtual machines on the demo CSV in the same manner. Congrats, if you set up network connectivity right and done this manual migration procedure correctly you have now migrated a first CSV with VMs to the new cluster in another AD domain that can talk to to VMs that are still on the old cluster.  Cool huh! What scenarios? Well, a hoster that has clusters in a management domain that runs different workloads for different customers (multiple ADs) or a company consolidating multiple environments on a common Hyper-V Cluster or clusters in a management domain, etc.

You need to update the integration components of the virtual machines now running but other than that, you’re all set. Just move along with the next CSVs / Virtual machines until you’re done.

Closing comments

Note, what to do if you don’t have shared storage. Move the disks to the new host/cluster, copy the data over (do NOT export the VMs, as that will not work in this scenario, see part 1) or … use VEEAM Replica. It will do the heavy lifting for you and help minimize down time.. Read this blog post by our fellow MVP Silvio Di Benedetto  and for more information Veeam Backup & Replication: Migrate VM from Hyper-V 2008 R2 to 2012 R2.

Good luck. And remember if you need any assistance, there are many highly experienced Hyper-V MVPs /consultants out there. They can always help you with your migration plans if you need it.

Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 1


Introduction

In this blog we’ll walk you through the process of migrating a Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster to a Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster in another Active Directory domain. You are reading part 1.

  1. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 1
  2. Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2

The source W2K8R2 Hyper-V cluster is a production environment. To test the procedure for the migration we created a new CSV on the source cluster with some highly available test virtual machines with production like network configurations (multi homed virtual machined). This allows us to demonstrate the soundness of the process on one CSV before we tackle the 4 production CSVs. Do note that in this case the two clusters do share the same SAN. If not we can move the storage, copy the data, replicate between SANs or use VEEAM Replica (see part 2 for more info).

Preparing the source W2K8R2 Hyper-V Cluster virtual machines & Cluster

Before we begin, I always make sure I have no Hyper-V snapshots  anymore on virtual machines I migrate. It prevents any issues on that front an while Windows Server 2012 R2 is better than before dealing with snapshots I prefer to have a little possible points of concern before I start such an operation.

Go to Failover Cluster Manager

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and shut down the virtual machines on the CSV you want to migrate.

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You’ll see them pending whilst they are shutting down …

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And when they are fully stopped we’ll removed the form the cluster.

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To do so, delete (scary word) the virtual machines on our CSV that’s going to be migrated from the cluster, which makes them no longer high available

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To do so you’ll need to confirm that this is what you want to do.

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In Hyper-V Manager we see that the virtual machines are indeed of line. As the virtual machines reside on cluster / CSV the path to the hard disk, config files etc is indeed under C:\ClusterStorage.

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We just close the Hyper-V Manager GUI. We will NOT export the VMs to import them on the new cluster. Why?

  1. This is not necessary as since Windows Server 2012 and as such also in R2 we can import them with the option to register them in place. No export is needed for this.
  2. Due to the fact the the is no longer there you cannot import virtual machines that have been exported from Windows 2008 R2 directly into Windows Server 2012 R2. This is due to the fact that the WMI v1 namespace was deprecated in Windows Server 2012, and then removed in Windows Server 2012 R2.  When exporting a VM from Windows 2008 R2, the WMI v1 namespace was used that resulted in an .exp file to represent the exported virtual machine. In Windows Server 2012 (R2) a new WMI namespace (version 2 or root\virtualization\v2) leverages an improved import/export model. This allows for registering the VMs in place as said in point 1. In Windows Server 2012 the version 1 WMI namespace was still there which allowed for importing of Windows Server 2008/R2 VM’s. In Windows Server 2012 R2 the version 1 namespace has been removed. So YOU CANNOT import virtual machines that where exported from Windows Server 2008/R2 into Windows Server 2012 R2. The workarounds are described here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/rmilne/archive/2013/10/22/windows-hyper-v-2012-amp-8-1-hyper-v-did-not-find-virtual-machine-to-import.aspx.

Now the combination of point 1 and 2 is what is used by the Copy cluster roles wizard in Windows Server 2012 R2. That works within a domain but not across separate AD Domains as in our case. But don’t worry. All this means is that we need to do some work manually and that’s it. That’s what we’ll describe in part 2 of this blog. Do realize you want to do this in one go as that ensures you have the least possible down time. In production don’t do part 1 of the blog on Monday and part 2 on Thursday or so Winking smile.

Read on here Migrating A Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V Cluster To Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V Cluster In Another Active Directory Domain – PART 2

Unable to retrieve all data needed to run the wizard. Error details: "Cannot retrieve information from server "Node A". Error occurred during enumeration of SMB shares: The WinRM protocol operation failed due to the following error: The WinRM client sent a request to an HTTP server and got a response saying the requested HTTP URL was not available. This is usually returned by a HTTP server that does not support the WS-Management protocol.


I was recently configuring a Windows Server 2012 File server cluster to provide SMB transparent failover with continuous available file shares for end users. So, we’re not talking about a Scale Out File Server here.

All seemed to go pretty smooth until we hit a problem. when the role is running on Node A and you are using the GUI on Node A this is what you see:

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When you try to add a share you get this

"Unable to retrieve all data needed to run the wizard. Error details: "Cannot retrieve information from server "Node A". Error occurred during enumeration of SMB shares: The WinRM protocol operation failed due to the following error: The WinRM client sent a request to an HTTP server and got a response saying the requested HTTP URL was not available. This is usually returned by a HTTP server that does not support the WS-Management protocol.”

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When you failover the file server role to the other node, things seem to work just fine. So this is where you run the GUI from Node A while the file server role resides on Node B.

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You can add a share, it all works. You notice the exact same behavior on the other node. So as long as the role is running on another node than the one on which you use Failover Cluster Manager you’re fine. Once you’re on the same node you run into this issue. So what’s going on?

So what to do? It’s related to WinRM so let’s investigate that.

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So the WinRM config comes via a GPO. The local GPO for this is not configured. So that’s not the one, it must come from the  domain.The IP addresses listed are the node IP and the two cluster networks. What’s not there is local host 127.0.0.1, the cluster IP address or any of the IPV6 addresses.

I experimented with a lot of settings. First we ended up creating an OU in the OU where the cluster nodes reside on which we blocked inheritance. We than ran gpupdate /target:computer /force on both nodes to make sure WinRM was no longer configure by the domain GPO. As the local GPO was not configured it reverted back to the defaults. The listener show up as listing to all IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. Nice but the GPO was now disabled.

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This is interesting but, things still don’t work. For that we needed to disable/enable WinRM

Configure-SMRemoting -disable
Configure-SMRemoting –enable

or via server manager

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That fixed it, and we it seems a necessity to to. Do note that to disable/enable remote management it should not be configured via a GPO or it throws an error like

image

or

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Some more testing

We experimented by adding 127.0.0.0-172.0.0.1 an enabling the GPO again. We then saw the listener did show the local host, cluster & file role IP address but the issue was back. Using * in just IPv 4 did not do the trick either.

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What did the trick was to use * in the filter for IPv 6 and keep our original filters on IPv4. The good news is that having removed the GPO and disabling/enabling WinRM  the cluster IP address & Filer Role IP address are now in the list. That could be good for other use cases.

This is not ideal, but it all works now.

What we settled for

So we ended up with still restricting the GPO settings for IPv4 to subnet ranges and allowing * for IPv6. This made sure that even when we run the Failover Cluster Manager GUI from the node that owns the file server role everything still works.

One workaround is to work from a remote host, not from a cluster member, which is a good practice anyway.

The key takeaway is that when Microsoft says they test with IPv6 enabled they literally mean for everything.

Note

There is a TechNet article on WinRM GPO Settings for SCVMM 2012 RC where they advice to set both IPv4 and  IPv6  to * to avoid issues with SCVMM operations. How to Add Trusted Hyper-V Hosts and Host Clusters in VMM 

However, we found that IPv6 is the key requirement here, * for just IP4 alone did not work.